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Your first grade teacher said it repeatedly…its only right to share. I have to say that I agree wholeheartedly. I have no tolerance for family researchers who refuse to share their discoveries. Some don’t blatantly refuse, they just never “find the time” to dig up what they’ve offered to share. Not only is it greedy and mean, it can be quite foolish too.

I’m telling you this as I sit in my cozy house in the heartland. Far away from the battered east coast and Atlantic shore, while my lights are flickering eerily and our giant oak trees are dancing wildly at the whim of Sandy’s winds. It hasn’t rained a drop yet here,  but my knobby joints tell me the rain will start soon. The month is October. It means raking up leaves, planning haunts and wearing pink ribbons. I am a survivor, so October is like being tapped on the shoulder for me. These are just a sampling of the reasons I want to share our stories with the rest of our generations.

The most efficient way to preserve family history is to spread it around.

Here in Indiana, the summer news doesn’t go for long without reporting from a community devastated by storms. Inevitably, there is the interview with a distraught resident clutching a battered photo album and crying. At least we have each other. From knee-deep in rubble that used to be a home, they have fished out the pictures and been thankful to have them. We all need this. We need a shred of proof that somehow, someway, we belong and are connected.

And, I am writing this post as my regular weekly topic in October for its publish date in November because on the day I’ll post it, I am scheduled for a surgery. Nothing big or important, but one whiff of anesthesia and I tend to sail out the window for a couple of days.
Doing this little medical “time out” in the middle of my NaNoWriMo with a twist is pretty crazy. I will be doing the previously un-tried.  I will be scheduling a post and not hitting the “publish now button.” So that in itself makes me nervous…what if…my post doesn’t post?

Maybe that’s only a bit of my own desperation to “share.” On a recent writing prompt, I mentioned that some of the stories I have.been privy to hearing will never see the light of day until a couple of generations have made their peace and feel distant enough from the event to hear the stories and not acutely feel the pain.

That‘s a huge reason to “share the wealth” if you will.  So if you can’t bring yourself to share the fruits harvested for your tree, at least consider what you would personally lose in a similar event.  There will be a Sandy, a Surgery, a Pink Ribbon or a “doing what is untried” in all our futures. Hopefully, when your turn comes, you will have shared enough that one of these inevitable life events will not land the memory of your family curbside for Tuesday’s pick up.